The Preserve by Ariel S. Winter

The Preserve by Ariel S. Winter


Thank you to Atria books for sending me a copy of The Preserve! This action packed sci-fi thriller is out today and you don’t want to miss it!

Decimated by plague, the human population is now a minority. Robots—complex AIs almost indistinguishable from humans—are the ruling majority. Nine months ago, in a controversial move, the robot government opened a series of preserves, designated areas where humans can choose to live without robot interference. Now the preserves face their first challenge: someone has been murdered. 


Synopsis:

Chief of Police Jesse Laughton on the SoCar Preserve is assigned to the case. He fears the factions that were opposed to the preserves will use the crime as evidence that the new system does not work. As he digs for information, robots in the outside world start turning up dead from bad drug-like programs that may have originated on SoCar land. And when Laughton learns his murder victim was a hacker who wrote drug-programs, it appears that the two cases might be linked. Soon, it’s clear that the entire preserve system is in danger of collapsing. Laughton’s former partner, a robot named Kir, arrives to assist on the case, and they soon uncover shocking secrets revealing that life on the preserve is not as peaceful as its human residents claim. But in order to protect humanity’s new way of life, Laughton must solve this murder before it’s too late. 

The Preserve is a fresh and futuristic mystery that is perfect for fans of Westworld and Blade Runner.

One By One By Ruth Ware

One By One By Ruth Ware

❄️ Book Review ❄️
Many of you know that Ruth Ware is one of my auto buy authors and One By One is another guilty pleasure thriller added to her arsenal!
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This was SO atmospheric, which is something Ware does very well. Set in the French Alps, I was so engrossed in the cozy, accessible only by lift chalet! Who wouldn’t want to stay a week in a staffed, luxury mountain resort chalet!?
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The mystery in this one just kept on spiraling out of control. And while I did guess ‘who dunnit’, I still enjoyed the ride. There are quite a few characters and at first I thought I would have trouble keeping track of them, but that didn’t end up being the case. Ware developed them all perfectly, as well as the faux social media app company they worked for.
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This is the type of thriller that I think a wide range of readers will like. It’s got some murders, but it’s not too violent. It has a lot going on but it’s easy to follow. A very fun read indeed!

Home Before Dark by Riley Sager

Home Before Dark by Riley Sager

14D8C0DF-0F7F-4D4E-BDEF-7F4A8640C70DWhat a fun, perfectly balanced ghost story! Sager just seems to hit it out of the park with every book!

I enjoyed the format of Home Before Dark, the chapters alternate between ‘the book’ that Maggie’s dad wrote about their experiences living in a haunted house when she was a child, and Maggie 25 years later trying to debunk what she thinks is all lies. This was new for Sager but he wove the different parts together seamlessly, which I think might be pretty difficult, not giving away too much too soon.

I didn’t think anything was over the top and the haunting seemed about as real as haunting can seem. I wasn’t exactly scared by this book but I did love the suspense. A very fun read that would be perfect in the fall!!

The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Dare’

The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Dare’

94C81797-5233-4286-BF9C-3FB58D87C6BDThank you to Dutton books for sending me a free copy of The Girl With The Louding Voice in exchange for my honest review.  All opinions are my own.

Synopsis:

Adunni is a fourteen-year-old Nigerian girl who knows what she wants: an education. This, her mother has told her, is the only way to get a “louding voice”—the ability to speak for herself and decide her own future. But instead, Adunni’s father sells her to be the third wife of a local man who is eager for her to bear him a son and heir.

When Adunni runs away to the city, hoping to make a better life, she finds that the only other option before her is servitude to a wealthy family. As a yielding daughter, a subservient wife, and a powerless slave, Adunni is told, by words and deeds, that she is nothing.

But while misfortunes might muffle her voice for a time, they cannot mute it. And when she realizes that she must stand up not only for herself, but for other girls, for the ones who came before her and were lost, and for the next girls, who will inevitably follow; she finds the resolve to speak, however she can—in a whisper, in song, in broken English—until she is heard.

My Review:

I needed this book. I needed it to remind me of how good I have it. It’s easy to get down on yourself or feel frustrated when your life isn’t going the way you want. But sometimes you need a reminder to stop and appreciate what you do have, what is going right! This book was that reminder for me. The struggles Adunni faces in this book are so much greater than anything I have had to deal with and my experience reading this book was a humbling one.

The Girl With the Louding Voice was also full of inspiration for facing your fears and fighting for what you want! I know I haven’t given much detail about this book but I think it will mean something a little different to everyone who reads it. I enjoyed it immensely and recommend it to everyone! And I have to mention, I mixed in the audio and it was fantastic!! It really brought the story to life!

The Family Upstairs by Lisa Jewell

The Family Upstairs by Lisa Jewell

CA0E94B9-933C-4C2E-BDB0-D457EC20E2B9Thank you Atria books for sending me a free copy of The Family Upstairs in exchange for an honest review.  All opinions are my own.

Synopsis:

Soon after her twenty-fifth birthday, Libby Jones returns home from work to find the letter she’s been waiting for her entire life. She rips it open with one driving thought: I am finally going to know who I am.

She soon learns not only the identity of her birth parents, but also that she is the sole inheritor of their abandoned mansion on the banks of the Thames in London’s fashionable Chelsea neighborhood, worth millions. Everything in Libby’s life is about to change. But what she can’t possibly know is that others have been waiting for this day as well—and she is on a collision course to meet them.

Twenty-five years ago, police were called to 16 Cheyne Walk with reports of a baby crying. When they arrived, they found a healthy ten-month-old happily cooing in her crib in the bedroom. Downstairs in the kitchen lay three dead bodies, all dressed in black, next to a hastily scrawled note. And the four other children reported to live at Cheyne Walk were gone.

My Review:

I honestly went into this novel blind because I have come to love and trust this author just that much! She creates dynamic and realistic characters, twisty page-turning plots, and her books are so much fun to read!

The Family Upstairs is told from three points of view.  At first, I couldn’t see how the three separate story lines would mesh together, although I had a feeling they would.  Jewell wound this one up so tight that as the novel progressed, the separate POV’s spiraled tighter and tighter until they all came together with forehead smacking perfection: as in “Duh, how did I not see that coming!?”

I was so invested in these characters and their lives which is unusual for me.  When a novel has duel or triple story lines, I find myself liking one better than the other but with this one, I was vested in all three.  A quick read, this novel was an easy five stars for me and will be perfect for any lover of mystery and suspense!

 

The Butterfly Girl by Rene Denfeld

The Butterfly Girl by Rene Denfeld

647BEE45-22D7-45CB-8CC5-8054FD816022Thank you Harper Books for sending me a free copy of The Butterfly Girl in exchange for my honest review.  All opinions are my own.

Synopsis:

From the highly praised author of The Child Finder and The Enchanted comes The Butterfly Girl, a riveting novel that ripples with truth, exploring the depths of love and sacrifice in the face of a past that cannot be left dead and buried. A year ago, Naomi, the investigator with an uncanny ability for finding missing children, made a promise that she would not take another case until she finds the younger sister who has been missing for years. Naomi has no picture, not even a name. All she has is a vague memory of a strawberry field at night, black dirt under her bare feet as she ran for her life.

The search takes her to Portland, Oregon, where scores of homeless children wander the streets like ghosts, searching for money, food, and companionship. The sharp-eyed investigator soon discovers that young girls have been going missing for months, many later found in the dirty waters of the river. Though she does not want to get involved, Naomi is unable to resist the pull of children in need—and the fear she sees in the eyes of a twelve-year old girl named Celia. Running from an abusive stepfather and an addict mother, Celia has nothing but hope in the butterflies—her guides and guardians on the dangerous streets. She sees them all around her, tiny iridescent wisps of hope that soften the edges of this hard world and illuminate a cherished memory from her childhood—the Butterfly Museum, a place where everything is safe and nothing can hurt her.

As danger creeps closer, Naomi and Celia find echoes of themselves in one another, forcing them each to consider the question: Can you still be lost even when you’ve been found? But will they find the answer too late?

My Review:

You guys. This book got me. It got me in the feelings and I am still thinking about this book days later. I read The Child Finder almost a year ago and I really liked it.  It was softer than the average thriller: more real and human and relatable. I was hoping that The Butterfly Girl would have some of those same qualities. Well, it did and them some.

While Naomi is searching for her long lost sister, she crosses the path of a ‘street girl’ named Celia.  I felt so strongly for Celia’s situation and her life and it just made me feel so sad at times, knowing that there are kids out there going through the same exact thing. Naomi’s actions with Celia were so humblingly realistic and I was loving Naomi’s character even more this time around.

As I finished the last few pages, I had tears in my eyes.  The ending is only just the beginning in this case, and I won’t say more so I don’t spoil it for you, but my heart felt so heavy.  Then I read the acknowledgment page and just lost it.  The author has been in similar positions as her characters in her real life, thus inspiring her to write these stories. I am just at a loss for anymore words.

Read BOTH of these books, they are real, visceral and important stories.

***NOTE***  This book does contain abuse towards children.  If this is something you cannot handle and is a trigger for you, you may not want to read these books. 

The Sisters Hemingway by Annie England Noblin

The Sisters Hemingway by Annie England Noblin

848705AC-BD28-4094-BFDA-8B317C08BB15Thank you to TLC Book Tours and William Morrow publishing for sending me a free copy of The Sisters Hemingway in exchange for my honest review.  All opinions are my own.

Synopsis:

The Hemingway Sisters of Cold River, Missouri are local legends. Raised by a mother obsessed with Ernest Hemingway, they were named after the author’s four wives—Hadley, Pfeiffer, Martha, and Mary. The sisters couldn’t be more different—or more alike. Now they’re back in town, reunited to repair their fractured relationships.

Hadley is the poised, polished wife of a senator.

Pfeiffer is a successful New York book editor.

Martha has skyrocketed to Nashville stardom.

They each have a secret—a marriage on the rocks,  a job lost, a stint in rehab…and they haven’t been together in years.

Together, they must stay in their childhood home, faced with a puzzle that may affect all their futures. As they learn the truth of what happened to their mother—and their youngest sister, Mary—they rekindle the bonds they had as children, bonds that have long seemed broken. With the help of neighbors, friends, love interests old and new—and one endearing and determined Basset Hound—the Sisters Hemingway learn that the happiness that has appeared so elusive may be right here at home, waiting to be claimed.

My Review:

The Sisters Hemingway is a character driven novel about family, love, and loss. It beautifully describes the way people react differently to difficult situations. After suffering loss after loss, the only thing The Hemingway Sister did the same was leave their small town.  But where they went from there was extremely different. I loved reading the story of these estranged sisters coming back together.  They thought they were facing the death of their aunt but they ended up facing so much more than that.

It’s been a while since I read a novel with such distinctly different yet realistic characters.  Each of the three sisters was so uniquely herself which added such  an endearing quality and authenticity to the story.  I was also pleased that these women weren’t damsels in distress looking for men to save them.  They only wanted to fix what was broken in their lives and thankfully that didn’t revolve around the need for a man.

I was fully invested in this story and enjoyed it from start to finish. The only thing that was missing for me was perhaps a little more grit, because in real life, things get tough.  The writing in this one is very soft around the edges, but is a great story overall.  I give this one four out of five stars and recommend it to anyone whole enjoys family, sibling, or sister stories.

Click the links below to purchase:

https://www.harpercollins.com/9780062674517/the-sisters-hemingway/

 

https://m.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-sisters-hemingway-annie-england-noblin/1129047313?ean=9780062674517#/